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Best hip hop artists

This autumn, we’re launching a brand new mentored online course teaching you how to get your home-recorded vocals sounding like the pros, check it out!

Try writing in a journal or on your computer as a continuous stream-of-consciousness for an hour. Don’t bother “evaluating” what you write, and don’t make any edits or changes — just focus on writing as fast as possible. It can help to write in a “free verse” style with lots of line breaks. While this can help you generate lines and lyrics, most often this can help you come up with “big ideas” or things you think are worth spending more time on. Which brings me to my next point…

In a song that was spliced together from the independent compositions of different feuding band members, John McVie’s contribution takes prominence here at the end. Played along an E minor scale, it starts with a long A and ascends to the C, before descending via a run of notes to resolution on the E. Simple yet effective, especially with the repetition, it builds up with intensity into a driving tempo over Mick Fleetwood’s drums. But one thing that shouldn’t be overlooked is how much musical tension is created between the bass and the lead guitar as a result of what I call “reverse” pedal point.

Where can i donate my electric organ

In 1972, John Fogerty left Creedence Clearwater Revival and their label, Fantasy Records. After he released his hit solo album Centerfield (1985), label head Saul Zaentz of Fantasy Records sued Fogerty for plagiarizing himself. Zaentz claimed that the single “The Old Man Down the Road” infringed upon “Run Through the Jungle,” a song that he had originally recorded with CCR under contract with Fantasy Records in 1970. Though he was not found guilty, it’s pretty novel that Fogerty was sued for sounding too much like himself!

All of our mentored online courses come with six weeks of 1-on-1 professional coaching and feedback on your work. It’s like having a personal trainer, but for music! Whether you’re interested to dive deep into a topic covered by one of our courses, like Orchestration for Strings, Unlocking the Emotional Power of Chords, or The Creative Power of Advanced Harmony, or just to work with a Mentor directly to achieve a specific musical goal, we’re here to help!

Plus, holy crap, they gave Bieber his own entire verse this time! He grew up so fast. Seriously, though, it’s really cool how all of the verses in this song are completely distinct from one another, yet still follow an 8+4 construction.

Finally, we come to the latest album in the list, although Ambiant Otaku is, like many of the others, the debut solo album of a legendary minimalist artist. Tetsu Inoue has been active since the early ’90s and has collaborated with other electronic artists such as Bill Laswell, Pete Namlock, Taylor Deupree, and others. Enjoy this last spacey, spectral, synthesized voyage!

This post is part of Flypaper’s Home Recording Week, where we’re sharing tips and insights from our community on home recording and production workflow. Read our featured articles here, or sign up for our weekly newsletter to make sure you never miss a beat!

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In case you haven’t seen this, or tried it yet, Classic FM (the website version) has created one of the most entertaining and informative tiny “time-waster” games on the internet that we’ve found so far. It’s called “Are These Words Composers or Types of Pasta” and it’s 15 questions of mouth-watering musical joy where you have to try to guess which is which. I’ve played this game thrice and somehow never gotten a perfect score.

“I Like It”: The intro here begins with a two-bar fade-in of non-loop material — yet even with these two bars, they still decide to keep the whole intro to a tidy eight bars. There’s a nice little post-verse thingy after the second verse. You can spot it by its chromatic walk-down piano motif, four quarter notes a step. This motif comes back for another post-verse that’s simply the title refrain a bunch, and then a half-chorus. Pretty inventive since half-choruses are rare, but here it’s easy to do as the chorus was already written in two parts!

They’ve essentially leveraged and reoriented a ton of the built-in features that their website-building service already provided to give musicians a way to design project campaigns and incentivize their backers with rewards. Here’s how it works.

We here at Soundfly always recommend that you read as much as you can about your craft. There’s no reason to stop learning, stop improving, or stop seeking better, more efficient, and more creative ways to make musical work. So without further ado, here are five essential recommendations for the mixing engineer’s bookshelf.

First off, I have to shout out the director Zack Scott, as he deserves most of the credit there. Zack and I have been dear friends ever since high school, and when I came to him for help with that video, my ideas were very, very rough and unrealistic. He looked at the resources we had and came up with a great concept that was totally within reach, organized a crew of his friends in Austin, and even chipped in some money (no small amount, I might add!).